Traveling to the Netherlands with a Brompton

What Options to Transport:

My Brompton with a full Brompton C Bag and a full Carradice Nelson long flap saddle bag at an Oakland BART station.

My Brompton with a Brompton C Bag and a Carradice Nelson long flap saddle bag at an Oakland BART station.

There are many options to travel on the plane with a Brompton. You can get a suitcase or a hard case that is designed for a folding bike, you can box it up at home or at the airport, you can also try gate-checking, or bring it on the plane as a carry-on. I took a combined approach. Because I wanted to be able to ride to and from the airports and not having to rely on taxis or transits, I decided to get a portable transport bag and checked in my Brompton. Moreover, I already have enough stress as it is from flying, I didn’t want the extra stress from dealing with TSA and gate-checking staffs.

The Nelson long-flap saddlebag and the Brompton C bag were enough a month's bike trip.

The Nelson long-flap saddlebag and the Brompton C bag were enough for a month’s bike trip.

From SFO to Schiphol Airport:

I took my Brompton along with a Brompton C Bag and a Carradice Nelson saddlebag to the BART station and arrived at SFO. The C Bag was big enough to fill 3-4 days worth of clothes and a laptop, while the saddlebag is filled with electronics, bike repair kits, and a transport bag. I have the Nelson saddlebag hooked up to a quick release clamp for easy on/off the saddle. Traveling during the rainy and cold season for a month requires some extra gears and because I wanted to blog while I was there, extra electronics were needed as well. These extra things made both bags very heavy and bulky, and a real hassle to bring my Brompton as a carry-on.

This transport bag by Vincinta served my purposes very well. When it's folded, it's small in size and can be mounted on the handlebar, bike frame or on a saddle with rings.

This transport bag by Vincinta served my purposes very well. When it’s folded, it’s small in size and can be mounted on the handlebar, bike frame or on a saddle with loops. When it’s opened, there’s enough room to shove in clothes or what have you to protect your Brompton.

When I arrived at SFO, I whipped out the transport bag and put my Brompton in at one of few shrink-wrapping stations. I didn’t remove anything from the bike and just tightened the hinge clamps. Then I stuffed my 3 separate plastic bags of clothes, two on both sides and one on top of the Brompton, all to protect the frame. And had the clerk shrink-wrapped it to keep everything in place. I asked the clerk whether he has a fragile sticker and he didn’t. The cost of shrink-wrapping was around $10-20. You can also have it bubble-wrapped too before putting it in the transport bag but that would cost extra.

Is this ideal for rolling your bike up the stairs or what? There is no sign saying bikes are not allowed.

Is this ideal for rolling your bike up the stairs or what? There is no sign saying bikes are banned.

After arriving in Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam, I unwrapped near the baggage claim where there is a nearby desk for assistance. I asked for a scissor and started cutting the shrink-wrappings away. And my bike came out in one piece!

As I walked around the airport, I scanned for anything that would serve people on bikes well. I saw this escalator that could be possibly for people with bikes. The ramp escalator can be activated to move in either direction. The incline is not as steep as a regular escalator and no steps which make it perfect to roll your bike up and down the ramp. Ingenious! I want to call this a “bike escalator” because this type of escalator is used in a few bike garages else where in the Netherlands.

What about showers when you arrive at the airport sweaty from riding your bike?

What about showers when you arrive at the airport sweaty from riding your bike?

If you ever come riding to the airport sweating, there are showers that you can use. I don’t know how much it cost, but I am sure your flight mates would appreciate you not smelling.  Moreover, in the basement floor of the airport, there are medium and large sized lockers that you can store your Brompton. The medium sized locker costs 7 euros/24 hrs which can fit your folded Brompton easily. The large sized costs about 9 euros/24 hrs. Either locker can be used up a maximum of 7 days which then your baggage will be stored in the baggage depot nearby at the same rate. The baggage depot carries boxes for bikes but they are for regular sized bikes. You can just cut it up to turn it into a smaller box.

Medium and large sized lockers can be found in the basement floor.

Medium and large sized lockers, along with boxes for bikes can be found in the basement floor at Schiphol Airport.

Taking my Brompton on Transits:

When I arrived in Amsterdam I was too tired to ride to Leiden which was my original intention. So instead, I rode the NS Intercity train which is conveniently connected to the airport below ground level. You can buy fares at a counter or at a machine. If you bring on a full sized bike, you will be charged 7-8 euros extra on a trip. A few times I brought my bike unfolded onto trains without any question asked. However, I folded partially when there are people around. A nice thing about Brompton is that you don’t have to remove any bag when folded partially.

Read small prints:  Conventional bikes

Conventional bikes need special tickets and are not allowed during rush hours from 6:30 – 9:00am and 4:30 – 6:00pm. Folding bikes is mentioned as a luggage if folded away. Space for bikes on trains are limited.

The NS trains go through every cities and stop conveniently in the heart of city centers. Huge bike parking garages are right there when you exit the stations. These are secured parking with staffs and bike repair booths. And there are charging stations for e-bikes! There are large sized lockers at these stations too that have enough space to store your Brompton or heavy baggage overnight (around 6 euros) or longer at an increasing sliding rate. I can say that very few passengers take their bikes on trains and which by design, space for bikes on train is limited, barely fitting a couple of bikes per bike-dedicated car.

This is a state of the art parking facility in Utrecht that accomodates 4500 bikes. Daily rate is 1.25 euros for bikes and 2.50 euros for cargo bikes. They also have bike rentals and bike repairs.

This is a state of the art parking facility in Utrecht that accomodates 4500 bikes. The first 24 hrs is free, after that, daily rate is 1.25 euros for bikes and 2.50 euros for cargo bikes. They also have bike rentals and bike repairs.

The Netherlands are known for their water ways but not everywhere are served by bridges. To help with crossings, water buses are strategically located. Some are free but many charge a fee of around 2 – 3 euros. No worries if you don’t know how to use the ticket machine. Just pay the staff when you are on the water bus. These water buses are nice and comfortable, and they have bike racks for both small and regular sized bikes, which are located in the front of the ferry.

Waterbus station at Dordrecht.

Water-bus station at Dordrecht. A bike rack that fits at least a 16″ inch wheeled-bike.

 On the Fietspad:

During the November in the Netherlands, I was fortunate to have only a few days rained on me while riding. I rode to 13 some cities via some small villages and took transit to 4 cities. On bike, I did about 300 miles and it was pure satisfaction! Where there’s pavement, the bike path is smooth. Where there’s no pavement, it only happens in rare occasions. I got a chance to ask Mark at BicycleDutch, when was the last time he got a flat tire on his bike. He said about 20 years ago! Yep, if I had known that, I would have lightened my bag by leaving some bike parts at home.

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The cycle tracks are constantly flanked by both sides of tall autumn trees and green pastures. More often than not, water ditches line between bike paths and the cows and horses grazing. In these water ditches, I saw swans, ducks, and geese. I saw a lot of ponies and I was wondering if ponies are one of Dutch favorite pets. And I still wonder. There were instances where I rode for at least 10 miles without sharing any road space with cars. Sometimes, I find my bike chain noise was the most annoying noise on the cycle track. Sometimes, I passed several groups of kids on bikes riding home from school far away from my destinations.

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Biking to Schiphol Airport:

Getting to Schiphol Airport by bike from Amsterdam is as easy as riding anywhere in the Netherlands. Most of the way was consisted of cycle tracks and some through shared side roads with cars. As usual, I relied on Google Maps on my I-Phone which was accurate 95% of the time. The other 5% I relied on street signs on cycle paths which are color red coded, different than the blue signs for cars.

Cycle track crossing under the airport

Cycle track crossing under the airport

Again, I didn’t bother with bringing my bike on the plane or gate-checking it. I went the safe route by wrapping the bike with clothes. The packaging booth doesn’t shrink wrap or carry bubble wraps because of security restrictions, so I had to buy a strap from them to keep my clothes attached to the bike. That’s something to think about when you are flying out of Amsterdam. I do recommend two straps for more secured packing. The plastic wrapping costs about 10 euros. The good thing is that they have “fragile” labels if you ask.

Ask for a "fragile" label if you decide to check in your bike.

Ask for a “fragile” label if you decide to check in your bike.

Conclusions:

I would do this again with my Brompton. It complements bike touring the Netherlands very well. Because it’s flat and easy to ride around, I didn’t have any difficulty with 16 inch tires and 2 speeds. Some hotels have very small and some even don’t have elevators with steep narrow stairs, but I didn’t have trouble managing it. Flashing bike lights are illegal, so bring spare lights, extra batteries, chargers, etc. Bring music too! The only complaint I have about the trip was that my baggages were too heavy to go any faster and longer.

The Netherlands is a beautiful place for cycling. Wherever you are, a bike path is footsteps away. The air is always fresh and pleasant, and you are away from car exhaust fumes. The built environment, whether the manicured trees or the row of brick houses, is intimate and human-scaled. It’s really safe, as expected. Drivers are considerate and mindful because they are also cyclists. I didn’t bring my helmet and rode everywhere without one. From the first day to the last day of my trip, I was just as amazed and awestruck. The cycle bridges are true wonders, the cycle tracks are long-lasting, and the number of people riding are like music to my ears.

Me and my Brompton in Bike Utopia...

Me and my Brompton in Bike Utopia…I will visit, again.

 

Product Review: M204 Monkey Light

monkey lights comparison

Welcome to a New Year! And to start a fresh year, let’s have a happy treat for your bike!

We have a product to review that you may like. It’s from Monkeylectric, made right here in Berkeley, USA. Nellie used to have the first Monkey Light, the Original M133 (now discontinued) and it was great while it lasted. However, it was really bulky, heavy, and conspicuous. In the recent times, they have come out with four new and improved different versions – M204, M210, M232 and Pro; price ranging from $26 to $900; in different sizes and in number of lumens.

M204 bike wheel light comes with 40 lumens, it's waterproof, and has 5 themes.

M204 bike wheel light comes with 40 lumens, it’s waterproof, and has 5 themes.

The smallest and lightest one is M204 model, which I found to be pretty affordable at $26. It claims to have 360 degrees visibility but it’s not so visible from either the front or rear view. The 40 lumens light is very visible from the sides but it’s still best to complement it with head and rear lights.

It  takes 3 AA batteries, lasts up to 60 hours of runtime, and fits 16" and larger wheels.

It takes 3 AA batteries, lasts up to 60 hours of runtime, and fits 16″ and larger wheels.

M204 is solidly built with silicone material encasing a computer and 4 LED lights (two on each side), making it waterproof. Good for going through wet puddles and rain. There are two user-friendly buttons, one is an ON/OFF switch and the other one is for switching to different colors and themes – 8 colors and 5 themes, which is plenty to play with.

These are the parts that come with the package - a power supply storage for batteries, plastic straps to tighten to wheel spokes, and 2 steel anti-theft fasterners.

These are the parts that come with the package – a power supply storage for batteries, computer/LED lights, plastic straps with rubber blocks to tighten to wheel spokes, and 2 steel anti-theft fasteners.

And installation is a cinch. It took me about 5-10 minutes. First, strap the computer/LEDs with two fasteners and rubber blocks to the wheel spokes. Then tighten the battery hub to the wheel hub with two fasteners, making sure they are aligned with the computer/LEDs for balance. Then connect the black wires. Done!

The battery hub should be installed across from the LED lights for balance.

The battery hub should be aligned with the LED lights for balance.

The Monkey Light uses 3 AA batteries and has a run time of 60 hours. That is pretty long. Because of the 3 AA batteries, it makes it visibly bulky and somewhat heavy but a great improvement. I would prefer it to have a USB cord or a rechargeable battery pack although it may sacrifice run time. I just don’t like waste and batteries are not cost-effective.

These images to show examples of colors and themes. Note: this is a camera effect. You would have to ride super fast to get this and at the right speed.

These images are to show examples of colors and themes. Note: this is a camera effect. You would have to ride super fast and at the right speed to get this effect. Or it may help by combining two M204 lights on each wheel.

For an inexpensive light like this, it’s hard to beat. It’s fun and yet, has a practical function- safety. M204 model has a total of 24 colors/combinations from white lighting for even more visibility to pink lighting for those of you expressing cuteness to rainbow colors for Bike Party fun-ness! And a two year warranty to boot that will guarantee its worth.

7 bike facilities Americans can learn from the Dutch

Linnaeusborg Centre for Life Sciences at the University of Groningen

Linnaeusborg Centre for Life Sciences at the University of Groningen

There are many things Americans can learn from Dutch bicycle infrastructure. The infrastructure (in addition to their road safety laws) is so unbelievable well done that the bike modal share is around 30% in the entire country (50-60% in some cities), the traffic fatality rate for all road users is 3X lower than in America, and up to 9X more safe for cyclists per km riding in spite of having kids and adults well into their 80s riding bikes. And the transportation engineers/urban planners don’t stop there; they are constantly improving on it at a rapid rate.

A boy biking home alone from school in Apeldoorn.

A boy biking home alone from school in Apeldoorn.

I see grade school kids biking alone to schools, taking field trips in groups, and I even see them taking their bikes onto trains (intercity routes, not within cities). You don’t just see young to middle-aged adults riding but every demographic with relative equal number of males to females including disabled people on their electric-assist wheelchairs on bike paths. Pretty much, how you would see in any population in the world. Everybody!

So, here are a list of seven bike facilities that Americans can copy from the world’s best infrastructure without removing road space for cars. Like I said, there are so much but I am listing the seven obvious ones.

1. Protected Intersections

When I was touring through 15 or so cities, not every road has bike path that is protected from automobiles. The ones that are not segregated are similar to white painted lanes that you see everywhere in America. However, the Dutch know it is absolutely necessary to have protected intersections even though roads have painted lanes. Because more than half of all bike collisions with cars occur at intersections, it is more important to have protected intersections than protected bike paths where space is limited. The protected intersections are clearly marked with red asphalted cross-bikes; shark teethed yield signs for drivers when approaching to make turns; cars are set further behind cyclists when both are waiting; and curb islands at corners to make drivers turn slower and to have a better view ahead. A nice explanation is found here.

A protected intersection in Rotterdam. Note curb island at left side of photo.

A protected intersection in Rotterdam. Note curb island at left side of photo.

2. Bike Traffic Lights

Another way to reduce crashes at crossroads (ones without roundabouts) with cars is to have traffic lights separately for cyclists. In Zwolle, the cycling city of 2014, many of its unprotected intersections have bike traffic lights. Bike traffic lights have sensors too but work in congruence with traffic lights for automobiles. In Groningen, the cycling city of 2002, green bike traffic lights on some busy streets allow all cyclists from every direction to cross. What these bike traffic lights do is that only cyclists are crossing through which makes it safe. Also, these all work because cars are not allowed to make right turns on red which makes bike traffic lights work really well in both unprotected and protected intersections.

Traffic lights for cyclists at a junction in Utrecht. Cars are not allowed to turn right on red.

Traffic lights for cyclists at a junction in Utrecht. Cars are not allowed to turn right on red.

3. Roundabouts

Roundabouts in the Netherlands are extremely common as elsewhere in other European countries. Stop signs are uncommon. Stop signs are inefficient and unsafe for both drivers and especially for bicyclists. Roundabouts get more cars moving than Stop signs and reduce wear and tear, and emission. And cyclists won’t need to stop due to momentum. This is actually more predictable for all road users and predictability makes roads safer. Not all drivers stop at Stop signs, and only some bicyclists are willing to stop, so this makes streets unsafe for all road users because of the unpredictability. Secondly, cars are coming from every direction which is also dangerous. At the junctions of roundabouts, roads are narrowed with enough space for cars going into and leaving from one spot where they are crossing. The narrow road brings autos down to a slower speed and if that’s not enough, speed bumps are placed just before the roundabouts to further impede speed.

A protected roundabout in Zwolle. Note the one lane each way for cars.

A protected roundabout in Zwolle. Note the one lane each way for cars.

4.  Bike racks at Bus Stops 

In cities like Oakland and San Francisco, it is just common sense to have bike parking at transit stations but bike racks at bus stops? Not so much. Multi-modal transport is key to any city’s transportation sustainability, and biking is a huge part of it. Providing bike racks at bus stops is just as important as having bike racks at train stations. BART and Caltrain, both rail transits for the Bay Area, certainly don’t go everywhere so buses are there to compensate. Particularly in the suburban regions, buses are the only public transport so installing bike racks next to bus stops will enhance multi-modal transportation.

A bus stop with bike racks in Eindhoven.

A bus stop with bike racks in Eindhoven.

5. Bike Ramps

At every bike parking station underground or above ground in the Netherlands, there are bike ramps (and some have bike escalators!) including elevators. Bike ramps are built at an incline that is easy to push up or down the stairs. There is only one bike ramp I found in all underground stations in the Bay Area and that is just pitiful on every level. We have bike parking but no bike ramps. Not all elevators are at every station and if there are, they are slow, cramped and reek of urine. Bikes are not allowed on escalators and how do transit officials expect women to carry their heavy bikes down and up the steep stairs.

Bike ramps at a bike parking garage in Utrecht. Note the easiness of pushing bikes up and down the stairs.

Bike ramps at a bike parking garage in Utrecht. Note the easiness of pushing bikes up and down the stairs.

6.  Sidewalks Conversion into Bike Paths in Suburbs/Exurbs

Suburbia and exurbia run rampant in the States and you rarely see people walking on sidewalks. It’s mostly empty. If you think about it, who would walk for such a distance when cars are there in every household? As I was riding between towns and cities, what I noticed surprises me. There are no sidewalks and if there are which is far and few in between, are very narrow. What’s in place of sidewalks are cycle tracks. It’s a brilliant idea! The cycle tracks are actually foot paths as well. The Dutch know that in far flung neighborhoods where cars are the major transport, you are not going to see pedestrians walking much so they turn that space into both foot and cycle paths. We can do that here as well in the States and that won’t impede the all mighty cars’ space.

A path for both pedestrians and cyclists outside of Amsterdam.

A path for both pedestrians and cyclists outside of Amsterdam city center.

7. Fietstraat

In some parts of the Bay Area like Berkeley and Palo Alto, there are “bicycle boulevards” that bicycles and cars share residential streets equally and at a low speed. In the Netherlands, fietsstraat (translated as bicycle streets) are taken a step further by turning residential streets into streets for bicycles with cars as guests. And fietsstraat are built to be like cycle tracks with the usual red asphalt (see photo below). Having this type of road design tells who clearly has the priority more and will appeal to inexperienced and risk-averse riders. Because bicycle boulevards are meant to be shared equally between drivers and cyclists and that naturally always puts cyclists as guests, especially when they still look like streets for cars.

Here, cars are guests on a cycle street or fietsstraat in Dutch.

Here, cars are guests on a cycle street or fietsstraat in Dutch.

Transportation and city officials, if you want to make your city livable for all demographics and reduce traffic fatalities, these are some of the things you can implement without much opposition from drivers. You know bicycle infrastructure is so much cheaper and more beneficial than any type of infrastructure, so let’s get serious and start executing it.

Dutch cycle bridges to live for…

When I am riding on Dutch cycle tracks, I feel wonderful and at the same time a superior sense of dignity you don’t get riding anywhere else. As I mentioned in previous posts (1,2) on “Dutch cycle tracks to die for…”, the paved bike paths are continuous, wide, smooth and “beautifully landscaped”. The “beautifully landscaped” theme is also extended to bridges built for cyclists as well.

The Netherlands probably has the most bridges in the world because of their numerous canals and ditches. And obviously, bridges built specifically for bicycles are a common sight. These bridges are boldly designed and constructed to show appreciation to people biking- at least I’d like to think so. Almost every cycle bridge that was built in the current era that I biked upon is an art piece. When you cycle on some of these bridges, you feel as though you are in a time capsule, while others you feel like you are flying in space. And some are built so that you can enjoy  the views of the city. The bridges are built with a slight incline that any unfit person can bike on.

There are also stunning bridges for cars and trains with bike paths on them, but I won’t be talking about them here because I want to point out to you how in the Netherlands, bicycling is just as important as other modes of transportation and this shows in the comparable quality of their bike infrastructure.

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The Nesciobrug (Nescio Bridge) is the longest cycle bridge in the country at 779 meters long and was built in 2006 at a cost of 9.5 million euros. The suspension bridge is located in Amsterdam connecting an island suburb of Ijburg to the mainland of the city. This is a bridge you don’t want to miss if you are in Amsterdam. It’s really long and really high up.

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The name of this green bridge located north of Nijmegen is accurately called “The Little Green One” or “Het Groentje” in Dutch. It is elegantly designed with an organic delicate look that to me looks like a part of a plant. It’s 120 meters long at a price tag of 4.8 million euros and was completed in 2013. The bridge helps thousands of cyclists cross a busy highway that runs beneath everyday. What’s cool about biking on this bridge is that there’s an elevated cycle track that sits approximately 4 stories high leading to another bridge that connects to “The Little Green One”. The whole experience of riding the whole thing through is quite exhilarating because you are continuously elevated.

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What a marvel! A first of its kind! A floating roundabout that keeps cyclists safe away from high volume traffic. It sits on the outskirts of Eindhoven. It is called Hovenring which priced about 20 million euros and was completed in 2012. It looks like a UFO flying saucer and looks even better at night. You can enter the Hovenring from 4 different directions which is so awesome! The track on it is so wide that it can also be a playground or spot to hang out.

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You can find this “Green Connection (De Groene Verbinding)” outside of Rotterdam that connects the city to a nature reserve. As you ride through this 190 meter long bridge (opened this year at a finished cost of 9.2 million euros), the shape of the bridge narrows and then widens. You feel as though you are going through a warped tunnel. Also, the LED lights which are connected to sensors come on as you approach the bridge. Very cool!

The photos here don’t capture the complexity of these structures and the experience of riding through them. Bicycle Dutch has wonderful videos on them. The videos about the bridges are below:

1. Nesciobrug, Amsterdam

2. Het Groentje, Nijmegen

3. Hovenring, Eindhoven

4. De Groene Verbinding, Rotterdam