Category: Bicycle Travel

Bike Denver

Flat Irons, near Boulder, Colorado

The Flat Irons near Boulder, Colorado, not far from Denver.

We have lived in and visited both coasts of the US and have a pretty good understanding of both sides. But we never quite understood Middle America, aside from what the media shows us. So, we decided to go visit Denver, Colorado. (No, not because of marijuana legalization there.) It’s not too far of a trip to take from the Bay Area, and I heard it’s not a bad city to bike in. Denver is referred to as “the mile-high city” or 5280 which is the number of feet it sits above sea level, and it’s located next to the Rocky mountains, which are the highest mountains in the United States.

This time, we planned to travel light which meant that Nellie brought only a single backpack and I brought only my messenger bag. We left our Bromptons at home because we thought the bike-share program that they have in Denver would suffice and be more convenient. The closest bike-share station would be only a block away from our hotel, so why not. As a bonus, our hotel was located next to the only cycle track in the city, on 15th St.

This bike share station is located on the sidewalks near our hotel on 14th St. and Welton St.

This bike share station is located on the sidewalk near our hotel on 14th St. and Welton St.

As a matter of fact, the bike-share stations are nicely distributed across downtown Denver. There are 700 bike-shares in 83 stations, twice as many as in San Francisco. It’s called Denver B Cycle, and sourced from the same company as most other bike shares in the US, Alta Bikeshare. Although their mobile app didn’t work, we could locate another station without even looking for one. It’s that ubiquitous. There was this brand-new redeveloped neighborhood called Prospect which was not completely done, and a bike share station was already in place. I was impressed.

A bike share station is placed in Prospect neighborhood which is not completely finished.

A bike share station is placed in the Prospect neighborhood, which is not even fully built out.

The bike shares are always located on the sidewalks and not in the street, which I think is an ideal setup. The sidewalks there are generally very wide, up to 20 ft/6 m wide. By locating the stations on the sidewalks, you don’t feel the pressure to hurry because you are in a safe zone. Also, it’s nice to undock or dock your bike off the street, unlike how it is in SF. Bike shares invite newbies, so having them on the sidewalks makes them more welcoming.

However, I still don’t like using bike shares when I would like to mindlessly wander throughout the city exploring. The 30-minute grace period was always on my mind because I didn’t want to accrue penalties. Also, docking/undocking is a huge hassle when you have to do it every 30 minutes. My opinion is that bike-shares are good if you know where you are going and only need it for going short distances. It would not be good for recreational our touristic cycling and for going long distances.

The only cycle track in the city on 15th St.

The only cycle track in the city on 15th St.

Our hotel was located next to the only cycle track in town on 15th St. It was nicely done with crossbikes and protected barriers, but the intersection was not protected. Also, what I don’t get is why the cycle track was on the left-hand side. I heard that another cycle track is coming to a nearby street on Broadway, a north-to-south commercial corridor which should make a better network of bike paths.

A crossbike with a right turn bike box.

A crossbike with a right turn bike box.

Another commercial corridor in downtown that is bike-friendly is the popular shopping area, the 16th Street Mall, which is closed off to cars. There are hundreds of shops and street vendors located on this long stretch. The identical tiles on both the street and sidewalks give it a very pedestrian-friendly feel to it. No need for bike signage.

16th Street Mall is closed off to cars except buses and bicycles.

The 16th Street Mall is closed off to cars except buses and bicycles.

Denver has a bike modal share of 2.9% in 2012 (20% jump from 2011), most of which I see riding on the extensive Cherry Creek bike trail. The Cherry Creek trail stretches 11.2 mi/ 18 km from Cherry Creek Reservoir in the south and through downtown in the north. It serves for both recreation and transportation. It’s a must if you do visit Denver and go for a bike ride. Some of the best scenery within the city is along this riverside bike trail. The water running next to it is surprisingly clean!

You see both recreational and utilitarian cyclists on the Cherry Creek bike trail.

You see both recreational and utilitarian cyclists on the Cherry Creek bike trail. I like how there are street signs installed on the bridges, so you know where you are going.

People actually go rafting on the creek and the water is pretty clean.

People actually go rafting and kayaking on the creek and the water is pretty clean!

Confluent People street art by local artist, Emanuel Martinez, under Speer Blvd. and Little Raven St.

The “Confluent People” mural by local artist, Emanuel Martinez is located at Speer Blvd. and Little Raven St.

What I like about Denver is it’s numerous parks, and the majority of them you can really bike within them for quite a distance with flat topography. City Park is my favorite and has a zoo and the Museum of Science and Nature. It’s located not too distant from downtown. Another park I recommend is Washington Park in the Pearl St. neighborhood. It’s voted as the most favorite park in Denver by the locals.

Denver City Park

City Park, not too far from downtown Denver, is a great place to bike recreationally.

Denver Bicycle Cafe

Our favorite cafe is the Denver Bicycle Cafe. You can get food, beer or coffee while you wait for your bike to be fixed.

Denver Bicycle Cafe

Denver Bicycle Cafe also has comfortable outdoor seating (not shown here).

Coolest looking bike corral in Pearl St. neighorhood.

A nice looking bike corral in the charming Pearl St. neighborhood.

Green Cyclery bike shop in Pearl St.

Cute little Linus bikes in the Green Cyclery bike shop on Pearl St.

Nice window dressing!

Creative window dressing using bike wheels!

I still think Denver has some ways to go in terms of bike infrastructure and reducing their use of cars. But I admire how much they are embracing the ideas of New Urbanism and I feel like they are doing the bike thing better and faster than many other American cities. For example, their 15th St. cycle-track was completed this year and now, the city is proposing another cycle-track on Broadway St. In addition, I really like their ubiquitous bike-shares, but it’s just not ideal for visitors to use them to explore the city because of the time limits. Visitors and recreational riders should rent a bicycle instead. Their Cherry Creek bike path is great fun to bike on and quite scenic, but then, it doesn’t go in every direction to really serve bike commuters. However, I do think that overall, the city government gets it and it’s just a matter of time.

A couple of more things I want to mention for anyone who is going to visit Denver and bike around. You may need some time to adapt to the higher elevation. At higher elevations, oxygen is less concentrated and so your body will have to adjust and breath shorter but more frequent breaths. At first, you might feel worn out faster when exerting yourself. However, the air is just fine for Denverites who are known to be very active outdoors. So once you adjust, you should be fine. Also, one of the fun things you can do in Denver, if you are of drinking age, is to ride your bike around to all the different local breweries and do some free tastings. Denver has great local beer! Many can be easily reached by bike.

Happy Trails!

What is better than biking? (continued)

Last post, I shared the first part of our experience biking in Half Moon Bay and cooking a recipe from a bicycle/camping cookbook called The Weekender by Pedal Inn. I continue here with the second part.

I cut the red cabbage on top of a small cutting board on top of my backpack! The Pedal Inn folks might laugh at me if they saw. =)

I cut the red cabbage on top of a small cutting board on top of my backpack! The Pedal Inn folks might have laughed at me if they saw. =)

So, what happened to that pot of cabbage?

Sadly, for our stomaches, nothing!

Because of the strong and cold winds, the water could not get to a temperature hot enough to boil. The wind kept minimizing the flames from the propane stove. So I could not boil the shredded cabbage and when it had come time to sautee it in the pan, I surely wouldn’t have been able to. The cabbage was an essential part of the Eggs Benedict recipe- the delightfully poached eggs were to sit upon a savory bed of sautéed red cabbage with onions and garlic, topped with creme fraiche and served with slices of hearty bread. We tried cracking an egg into the pot to see if it would cook and it never did.

While we were still waiting for the pot to boil, a little chubby boy was walking by on the sand and when he saw our pot he exclaimed, “That’s cool!” In my head, I was like, “You have no idea, kid!” Chris said he got really appetized waiting for the pot to boil and had been looking forward to the meal. So we were both disappointed when we couldn’t get the stove hot enough to cook the food.

I was sure the dish would have been delicious if we had been able to cook it. The windy and cold weather did not cooperate with our plans, and we later found out that the first part of the year is not really the best time to visit Half Moon Bay. It is warmer and less windy during the latter half of the year. Also, I used a propane stove which I think is designed more for indoor use. They make stoves specifically for camping and those burn alcohol. Maybe that could have withstood the wind better.

Defeated, we packed up our stuff, shook the sand out of our bikes and then headed home. But in my head, I was determined to try this dish. I had to know how it tasted! I was going to try again, but this time in my own kitchen. I still had the unopened pack of creme fraiche. I had the carton of eggs we bought and there was still a lot of red cabbage left.

One morning soon after our excursion, I made the recipe at home and it came out fantastic! The flavors blended wonderfully and the dish seemed fresh and healthy. I don’t have a lot of experience poaching eggs so I kind of overdid them, but nevertheless, when I ate them with creme fraiche, it was heaven. I could imagine how much more wonderful it would have been to eat this dish at Half Moon Bay on a good day, with the sights of the sea, sky, and cliffs.

I didn't make the poached eggs well, but the dish still came out delicious especially because of the creme fraiche.

I didn’t make the poached eggs well, but the dish still came out delicious especially because of the creme fraiche.

Now, about The Weekender cookbook, I really liked and learned many things from it and the whole experience. I now use the combo of creme fraiche with poached eggs on a regular basis- yum. Even though I don’t personally feel cut out for camping and cooking outdoors, I think the recipes are still great for cooking at home. I think they really represent the flavors of California and Bay Area cuisine. For anyone who loves the outdoors, camping, biking, and cooking or is curious to try, I think this cookbook is the perfect resource for you. It will challenge you a bit which is what I think is part of what makes the outdoors exciting. Challenging yourself to go to new places, climb a hill or mountain (with your two feet or two wheels), and then achieving that great reward at the end- a sense of accomplishment, amazing and breathtaking views, and renewed sense of wonder about nature and the world.

As it pertains more to biking, it is also a great reflection of the biking experience. In a previous post titled Exploring A City by Bicycle (a love letter to urban biking), I wrote about how biking is a very sensory experience where almost all your senses are engaged. When biking, you see many things with your eyes, you hear and smell the world around you, and you feel the breeze on your skin. The one sense missing is that of taste. This cookbook, The Weekender, fills in that last piece bringing the biking experience and taste together to create a complete experience for all your senses. So I believe that with this book, and with those who have the initiative and drive for adventure (and good eats), the rewards reaped will be like a “sweet song that you [and your tastebuds] will remember for as long as you can”.

Pedal Inn Weekender Cookbook
Currently $19.95 USD for the print edition at their online store

THE PEDAL INN WEEKENDER INCLUDES:
♥ 5 Weekender menus, inspired by 5 enticing Bay Area bike camping destinations
♥ 25 camp-tested recipes for two hungry cyclists
♥ Meal plans ideal for the overnight jaunt or for the savvy home cook
♥ Dishes designed for flavor & freshness first but with an eye towards ease and efficiency
♥ Tips, insights, and inspiration helpful for new and experienced bike campers alike
♥ Weather-resistant, tour-worthy vinyl pouch, fit for a cycling jersey or handlebar mount

There is also an e-book version for $7.95

www.pedalinn.com

pedalinnlogo

What is better than biking?

Answer: Biking and eating!

In this post, I share our experience biking in Half Moon Bay, California and cooking a recipe from The Pedal Inn Weekender cookbook right on the beach. If you love biking and eating/cooking, then read on!

hmboverlook

Our bikes and cargo overlooking the sea at Half Moon Bay.

A few years ago, on one of our memorable nights out biking with the SF Bike Party at a rest stop upon a hill taking in the sights of the beautiful city, someone handed us a yellow matchbox with an illustration of a crest on it with “The Pedal Inn” written across the top and an image of two people wearing outdoor gear having a picnic beside their bicycles. On the back it read, “For lovers of adventure and good eating”. I was curious what that was and the woman who handed it to me told me it was a cookbook. I was intrigued because I love biking (that’s the name of our blog) and I love eating and cooking too and here was a couple that had combined these things into a single concept that they could share with others- a cookbook and guide to biking/cooking/camping. After visiting their website at www.pedalinn.com I said to myself, I have to try this one day!

Not too long ago, I decided it was a good time to try out the cookbook. Thanks to Nick and Lindy, the authors of the cookbook, I was able to get a copy of it for myself. When it came in the mail and I unwrapped it, I saw it was beautifully put together. Inside the plastic pouch, was an assortment of booklets/pamphlets. The main book had Weekender written across the front and was nicely illustrated inside and out. The others were more like simple folded pamphlets with recipes in them and were designed to be easy to travel with. Each recipe pamphlet had the name of a great Bay Area biking locale such as China Camp, Lake Del Valle, and Mount Diablo to name a few and the corresponding recipes that matched the theme of each place. The writing was a joy to read and it began to dispel the mysteries of camping/biking/cooking to me.

The Pedal Inn Weekender cookbook.

The Pedal Inn Weekender cookbook.

You see, although I love biking, I have very little experience in the long-distance touring sort of rides. Also, I have only camped outside maybe once or twice in my life when I was young and my much older sisters took care of everything. They packed the tents and brought all the provisions. I still remember the yummy baked bananas my sister made over the grill using foil but I didn’t really know how it all came together, just that it tasted unbelievably good (something about eating food in the great outdoors enhances it).

So as I perused these guides with names of places that called out to the adventurous side of me, a feeling of anxiety began to set in. After cooking for five nights a week for the past seven years, I can now say I know how to cook with complete confidence. So perhaps it was because I know how to cook that seeing the recipes made me break into a sweat. Because of my experience, I could quickly see this wasn’t just a cookbook about throwing together some Chex Mix to bring with you onto the trail. This was, you could say, gourmet stuff and what made it challenging was picturing myself trying to cook this stuff not in a kitchen in the sterile comfort of my home, but outdoors in an unpredictable and variable environment. I was sure the efforts would probably have been worth it once we tasted the finished dishes, but getting to that point was the hard part.

As I began to plan the trip, I was thinking in my head, “How the heck can I do this? I can’t do this. No, I CAN do this. No, I can’t! Yes, I can! And finally, “Okay, I just won’t camp out overnight and even though I don’t know how I am going to cook this stuff outside, I am going to do it anyway! I will do this whether I can or not.”

Fast forward two weeks later, and it is the morning on a fine Sunday. Chris and I are shuffling around the house trying to pack stuff. I grab our propane stove we have used many times for Chinese hot pot. I grab some spatulas, spoons, and pour some olive oil into a small plastic case. I didn’t pack everything I needed because the idea was that we’d stop by a market along the road during our bike ride to buy fresh ingredients. That would be part of the Pedal Inn experience.

Our destination was Half Moon Bay, a place where we would ride along a path overlooking the sea and then camp out on the beach for the afternoon. The recipe pamphlet for Half Moon Bay was stuffed into our Brompton bag pocket, and we were off in our tiny car with the bikes and cargo stuffed in the back.

When we got to Half Moon Bay, we first stopped into a market on Main Street. We found what we needed there and even a fresh pack of creme fraiche. We were going to make Pedal Inn’s version of Eggs Benedict. They use creme fraiche instead of Hollandaise sauce. That was just the breakfast recipe and the only one I felt confident enough to try. They also had a recipe for dinner and dessert. Dinner was Fish Tacos with Pom-Persimmon Salsa and dessert was Blackberry “Shortcake” in origami folded cups. Sounds delicious, doesn’t it? These are also the perfect recipes for Half Moon Bay, a place by the sea that is influenced by Mexican culture due to the migrant workers that live in the area and who work on the local farms.

Red cabbage at Cunha Country Grocery Store at 448 Main St. in Half Moon Bay.

Red cabbage at Cunha Country Grocery Store at 448 Main St. in Half Moon Bay.

We then rode our bikes along the path by the beach and it was a picturesque and lovely experience. The view was amazing and the waves crashing onto the beach were furious. We saw people riding horses and many people walking along the path. People were sitting out on the beach down below. I had the stove in a backpack on my back along with all the ingredients. It was getting kind of heavy. Having panniers would have helped a lot with that.

One of the interesting wooded parts of the path.

One of the interesting wooded parts of the path.

Others rode real horses and we rode horses made of steel. =)

Some people rode horses and we rode horses made of steel.

Ahh, the beautiful sea at Half Moon Bay.

Ahhh, the beautiful sea at Half Moon Bay.

After riding around a bit, we went down to the beach and opened up our picnic blanket. We set our bikes on top of some succulent plants so that less sand would get into the chains. We set up the stove and the wind was blowing so hard, I was afraid that we would not be able to get the fire lit. But it was lit. We poured water into the pot and waited for the water to boil. I cut the red cabbage on a small cutting board on top of my backpack. I added the cabbage to the pot and then…

This story is getting long so check back next post for what happened to the pot of cabbage!

To be continued…

Exploring A City by Bicycle

bicycleside

When you are exploring a city on the seat of a bicycle, you are making a deeper connection with it. You are engaging more of your sensory faculties and your whole body is in motion. With every pedal forward, you are opening yourself up to what is around you, making yourself vulnerable but also much freer. When you are on a bicycle, there is nothing between you and the world around you except a space of air. There is no glass, perfumed interior, no controlled climate which can keep you comfortably contained. The raw elements of the world reach you. But you can be more quick and nimble, and you can choose to go at your own pace- you decide. Almost all of your senses are engaged. With your eyes, you can see wonderful sights- from the shape of a landmark set against the sky, to the reaches of the horizon. You can see humanity around you and the expressions on people’s faces. With your ears you can hear the soundtrack of the world- of laughter and sneezes and conversation, set amidst the medley of city noises. With your nose you can smell the scents of not just exhaust and refuse, but also of trees, flowers, and grass, Chanel perfume, and bread being baked. Most wonderfully is the experience of feeling the wind on your skin and in your hair. Sometimes the air is crisp, sometimes more humid and warm, but always you feel something. This creates a symphony of sensory input that feeds into your body, mind, and imagination. The music of this chorus is like a sweet song that you will remember for as long as you can. It is one of the most delightful and simplest of joys- riding a bicycle in the city and especially one that you love.

Bike Vancouver – Part 2 of 2

Engraved bike sign along the route of Vancouver Convention Centre

Bike signage chiseled into concrete along the route of Vancouver Convention Centre. It’s on there for good.

If you are ever heading to Vancouver to bike, you should never skip the Seaside Bicycle Route. It is the best way to see the beauties of Vancouver and it will take you to many tourist attractions such as the new Vancouver Convention Centre, Stanley Park, English Bay and Granville Island. The route also takes you through local towns such as Coal Harbor, West End, Yaletown and Kitsilano. It is 15 miles or 24 km long, separated far away from noisy cars and next to the shore the entire way through.

However, on some sections of the Seaside Bicycle Route bicyclists have to share it with pedestrians (better than sharing it with motorists though). Because there are so many interesting and breathtaking sites to see, it may take the whole day, so you may want to separate the trip into a couple of days which we did.

The bike route starts at either end of

The blue line indicates the Seaside Bicycle Route which is 15 miles/24 km long.

If anything, you must not skip riding on the seawall of Stanley Park (see video above). It’s spectacularly wonderful! There are a lot of bike rentals in the area if you need to rent a bike.

An Aquabus ferry that accepts bicycles. Look for that big bicycle sign.

An Aquabus ferry that accepts bicycles. Look for that big bicycle sign.

You could cross over False Creek to cut your trip shorter by hopping on the Aquabus or False Creek Ferries at designated terminals.  The fares are pretty reasonable and they make frequent pickups. The Aquabus accepts bicycles but not False Creek Ferries.

The popular Olympic symbol for 2012.

The popular Olympic symbol for 2012.

Canadians biking near the English Bay.

Canadians biking near the English Bay.

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What a beautiful day!

Sunsetting on the English Bay.

Sunsetting on the English Bay.

Bicycle route along Stanley Park.

Bicycle route along Stanley Park.

Pretty cool that a street is named Penny Farthing.

Pretty cool that a street is named Penny Farthing!

Interesting park at a new neighborhood of Creekside.

Interesting park at a contemporary neighborhood of False Creek.

Located outside of the Science World museum, this bike rack is powered by solar panel.

Located outside of the Science World museum, this bike rack is powered by solar panel.

My Brompton is sunbathing on Kitsilano Beach.

My Brompton is sunbathing on Kitsilano Beach.

After a nice ride, you have to go this place that serves delicious Belgian waffles. It is called Nero Belgian Waffle Bar, located in the West End neighborhood.

After a nice ride, you have to go to this place that serves the best Belgium waffles called Nero in the West End.

Yes, Nero Belgian Waffles Bar welcomes bicyclists.

Farewell Vancouver! Till next time.

Farewell Vancouver! Till next time.

Bike Vancouver – Part 1 of 2

We saw many of these either in silver or black like this one here dotted throughout the city.

We saw many bike racks like this one in silver or black placed throughout the city.

We recently went to Vancouver, B. C. for a short vacation. It was my third and Nellie’s fourth time visiting the west coast Canadian city. We enjoy visiting Vancouver because it is the closest destination (just 2.5 hrs by plane from San Francisco) where we can experience something different from American cities. The people are nice and helpful and the city is clean, well laid-out, and beautiful. In addition, the food is excellent. You can randomly walk into any eatery and come out feeling satisfied. Vancouver has been ranking near the top in livability for the last few years and I can see why.

There is this 30 km seaside bicycle trail that lines the city.

There is this 30 km seaside bicycle route that outlines the city. Pedestrians on the outer side and bicyclists on the inner side.

The last time we were there in 2009, we saw very little bike infrastructure. But recently, John Pucher, a cycling guru paid a visit to Vancouver and said that this city should be talked about as the best bike-friendly city in North America. The city was selected to have the Velo-City Global conference, a premier marketplace for bicycling delegates, which was held last year. They have mayor Greg Robertson who is a bike commuter and a city council that is not afraid of implementing bike facilities. Moreover, a bike-share program is expected to roll out early next year in downtown Vancouver. In addition to striped bike lanes, they have a few real cycletracks that are as good as those in Copenhagen, but of course they are not nearly as ubiquitous. Bikes are allowed in all modes of transit from buses to Sky Trains to Seabus ferries. Not to mention, a popular bike/fashion magazine called Momentum which is geared for regular people riding bikes, is based in Vancouver. Every year, there is a very large and notable turnout there for the World Naked Bike Ride.

Bike symbol next to Street  name to indicate that there's a bike way.

A bike symbol next to the street name indicates a bikeway is on that street.

Because Vancouver doesn’t yet have bike routes going everywhere, it is nice to see bike signs showing where the bicycle routes are. Having bike routes clearly marked and indicated on street name signs like the one shown above allows our eyes to automatically know where to look for the bike signage. It also helps drivers know to expect bicyclists if they are taking that street. It is so much better than placing bike signs on the sidewalks which are hard to see, can be blocked by tree branches or other nearby sign poles.

Green paint to alert drivers crossing bike lane.

Green paint to alert drivers crossing bike lane.

Although I despise anything that is just merely a striped bike lane, I think Vancouver does them better than San Francisco. For example, notice the green paint near the driveway for cars (see image above). It alerts drivers that they are crossing a bike lane and to look out for bicyclists. I think this is a brilliant way of using green paint. In SF, this is done in the opposite way. An example would be the Embarcadero in SF (sorry no photo) where the bike lane is painted green but when it reaches driveways the green paint disappears. What this signals is that it tells bicyclists to be the responsible party. It doesn’t make any sense, right?

More green bike lanes

Notice that the green paint in the bike lane starts as the car approaches the intersection.

In the image above, the bike lane is painted green as it reaches the intersection to warn motorists merging right to execute a turn that they are crossing through a bike lane. However in SF, this is not being done at all.

Crossbikes are common but less common at smaller intersection.

Crossbikes are common at intersections where there are protected bike lanes.

As mentioned in my other post, crossbikes are such a brilliant idea utilized by many bike-friendly cities. When you are riding across a busy/large intersection, do you ever feel that you are endangered? What about when you are walking and there’s no crosswalk? I got to ride in these crossbikes in Vancouver, and I can tell you it’s one of the best bike facilities ever created. Again, SFMTA needs to implement these.

Burrad Bridge is one of the 4 bridges in Vancouver with a cycle track.

Burrard Bridge is one of the 3 bridges in Vancouver with a cycle track.

There are five bridges in Vancouver, and four of them you can bike on. A popular bicycle route to get from downtown to the Kitsilano neighborhood (known for having the best beach in the city) is through the Burrard Bridge (image above). It has a dedicated cycle track for bicyclists. However, these bridges have a long incline and are not suited for any 8 to 80 y.o. bicyclist. What they need is a separated bridge just for bikes and pedestrians.

Below is a video (Note: Sound is muted, so don’t think your computer speakers are broken) showing what it’s like to ride in a cycle track in downtown Vancouver. (Editor’s Note: As you might be able tell in the video, he was having a ball!) The cycle track on Hornby St. is raised with car parking to the left, and a buffer with plants to the right of the parked cars. It is a great piece of bike infrastructure!

Although Vancouver has some great pieces of bike infrastructure and an amazing sea wall (which will be discussed in Part 2 of this series) navigating around Vancouver on a bike was not really that easy. It is still a very car-centric city. There seemed to be way more cars than when we were there before. There are many streets that do not yet have bike infrastructure. Riding on the main streets can be hair-raising. Also, there are only one or two streets going east to west that have bike routes. Then there are streets like Robson, Denman, Granville, and Davie Streets that are meccas for shopping and eating but do not have any bike routes on them. It seemed intentional that bike routes were not placed on them perhaps because they don’t have much space. But I thought that was kind of ridiculous. It is all a matter of re-prioritizing use. Bicyclists also shop and eat too, and studies (1,2) have shown they spend more money and frequent businesses more than motorists. At the very least, there should be bike sharrows.

In Vancouver, helmets are mandatory and I believe this could dampen ridership which may lead to less safety for bicycling on the streets. It should be optional for adults and mandatory for children. Motorists in Vancouver are courteous and more patient, and with some streets that have really good bike infrastructure, I don’t see why helmets are mandatory. In addition, they have a wonderful seaside bicycle route away from car traffic and they are still required to wear helmets there. What they need is to get more bicyclists on the streets and a helmet law doesn’t help with that.

I gotta admit, Vancouver is a hilly city. Although the hills aren’t as steep as San Francisco’s, it’s going to be tough to attract the 8 to 80 y.o. crowd. In order to get more people to bike over those hills and bridges, I believe electric bikes is the answer. I think if somehow electric bikes are marketed right like having e-bike shares for the public to try, that could be a good way to help people who are on the fence realize it is right for them.

Overall, Vancouver has done a great job in improving their bike infrastructure in just a few years. The speed at which they have been able to implement bike improvements is impressive.

In the next post on Vancouver, I will discuss more about biking along the sea wall in Vancouver and what we saw while biking around. Stay tuned…

Book Review: In the City of Bikes by Pete Jordan

The day after coming back from Amsterdam, I was fortunate enough to meet author Pete Jordan at a book reading for his new book In the City of Bikes, a book about bicycling in Amsterdam. He’s an American who went to Amsterdam over a decade ago to study urban development and instantly fell in love with the city and their bicycling culture. So he expatriated there.

It was perfect timing for me to hear about his new book on bicycling in Amsterdam since I just took a trip there and there were a couple of things that I observed that I didn’t understand. Also, I wanted to learn what made Amsterdam the world’s friendliest city for people on bikes. It just boggles my mind that cycling is so prevalent in Amsterdam (and a few other cities) but everywhere else in the world is pretty much dominated by automobiles. While my experience was still fresh in my mind, the book answered my questions and in a wonderful way, it extended my vacation psychologically.

Pete Jordan, the author of In the City of Bikes

Pete Jordan, the author of ‘In the City of Bikes’ at a book reading in San Francisco.

In the City of Bikes

In the City of Bikes – The Story of the Amsterdam Cyclist

As you can see from the table of contents, there’s over a hundred years (started from the 1890s) worth of bicycle history in Amsterdam. The book has in-depth quotations, facts, and details for almost every important decade chronologically.

Table of Contents p.1

Table of Contents p.1

Table of Contents p.2

Table of Contents p.2

In the City of Bikes also reads like a personal memoir which I really enjoyed reading. One example is when his wife, Amy Joy becomes a bicycle mechanic and subsequently starts a bike shop. Another example is the bonding between father and son when his son Ferris sits in front of him on a bicycle playing the game Which Way?.

Mostly, the book speaks about the rich historical culture of bicycles in Amsterdam and it’s engaging. Amsterdammers had fought for their ways against anti-cyclists, Nazi occupation and confiscation of their bikes, and rampant thievery. Through it all, they still tried to implement the White Bicycles Plan in the 1960s which has inspired today’s bike-share programs around the world just as much as their utopian bicycle infrastructure.

The author also covers the story about the famous and controversial Rijksmuseum bike passageway which was recently reopened to cyclists after a decade of closure and was breaking news in the city.

If you are interested in cycling and Amsterdam cycling, both historically and culturally, then this book is for you!

One thing I would like the author to elaborate a little more on is to have more emphasis on his personal experience as an American foreigner moving to Amsterdam for the bicycle culture and also so I can relate even more closely to his passion for bicycling. Perhaps he’s saving it for his next book? I hope so.

Pete Jordan is also the author of the memoir Dishwasher:  One Man’s Quest to Wash Dishes in All Fifty States.

HarperCollins Publishers, 2013, $15.99 USD.

Related post:

In the City of Bikes by Pete Jordan – Book Reading